Why There’s So Much Blue and Orange On-Screen

Sep 12, 2017

Okay, this is a weird one in a wild way, which is good. So maybe you’ve noticed the trend in movie posters, especially action or sci-fi movie posters, over the last 20 years or so that involves a proliferation of the complementary colors blue and orange. Usually the blue is the primary of the colors, a general tint to the main images, and the orange is used for lettering and accents within the main images.

Once confined to print media, this distinctive palette has been making its way into actual films as well, a particular balance of shadow and light, coolness and heat, intrigue and action. You might be tempted to pin this on the most blatant purveyor of the palette, Michael Bay, but according to the following video from Fandor, it’s actually a trend that goes back a little further than the bombastic director, and it’s not just a pretty pairing from the color wheel, there’s some method to the colors in combination, in terms of color theory, grading, and balance against the two most common images in cinema: flesh and sky.

Though just shy of two minutes, this is a thorough and thoroughly-captivating lesson on the blaring significance of one of filmmaking’s most insidious facets. You gotta check it out.

Read more at Film School Rejects: https://filmschoolrejects.com/curious-case-complem...


To learn more about DFS and SpeedLooks, visit looklabs.net/ to see how easily you can achieve a great color finish on your next project.

Fairlight Audio Technology for Professional Finishing

Sep 10, 2017

With Blackmagic's acquisition of Fairlight, a time-tested audio technology, DaVinci Resolve 14 is built to be a powerful post-production audio tool for film and broadcast.

Couldn't run DaVinci Resolve on your laptop? You might be able to now, with Blackmagic's recent announcement that they have made processing 10x faster through CPU and GPU optimizations. Not only that—Blackmagic is dropping the price of the software from $999 to a $299 license and doing away with those pesky dongles.

Most importantly, with Blackmagic's acquisition of Fairlight, a time-tested audio technology, DaVinci Resolve 14 is built to be a powerful post-production audio tool for film and broadcast. Basic features include sound editing, mixing and routing, professional busing and multi-format mastering to 3D audio formats like 5.1, 7.1 Dolby and 22.2.

This iteration of Resolve, what Blackmagic is calling "the biggest release in the history of the product," aims to encourage filmmakers and post-production professionals to be able to work together all in one environment.

If you missed this No Film School article earlier this year, check it out at this link: http://nofilmschool.com/2017/04/blackmagic-davinci...


Pictured - Fairlight 2-Bay Console Running DaVinci Resolve 14

To learn more about DFS and SpeedLooks, visit looklabs.net/ to see how easily you can achieve a great color finish on your next project.

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 14 Now Available!

Sep 9, 2017

Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve 14 merges three applications into one, with faster video playback for editing, Fairlight audio engine support and new colour grading tools.

For colourists, more than 20 new effects have been added including a new stabilizer. Another new effect is the face refinement filter, which automatically recognizes and tracks facial features. This is done without rotoscoping and can be used to adjust uneven skin tones, add natural colour and brighten eyes.There are many other handy features in the new update, including colour-assigned timeline tracks, undo history list, distortion and de-haze effects to name a few.

Collaboration features will also allow editors, colourists and mixing engineers to all work on the same project file simultaneously. Collaborators can use clips others are working on, and even use a chat client to discuss progress with others. For large team productions, working simultaneously on a sequence in real time could save a lot of back-and-forth between team members. Once separate changes have been made, sequences can be compared and merged together with ease.

Read the entire article by Adam Plowden and cinema5D.com and see how you can download a FREE copy of Resolve 14.... https://www.cinema5d.com/blackmagic-davinci-resolv...


To learn more about DFS and SpeedLooks, visit looklabs.net/ to see how easily you can achieve a great color finish on your next project.

The Resolution Myth Debunked!

Aug 17, 2017

Safe to a assume that more resolution and pixels is better - or have we hit a limit the eye can see? DP Steve Yedlin argues that we are already at peak resolution.

Steve Yeldin ASC, is a top feature cinematographer and inventor. Before log recording was possible on tape, Steve created YEDLOG for the early Sony F900, a system for shooting LOG on linear cameras years before techniques like CineStyle came out. In this article and accompanying videos, he illustrates what different resolutions from different actually look like from a perceptual stand point. Will you be able to tell the difference between a 12K film scan and 3K Alexa image? Check out Steve's No Film School article and his two "must watch" videos.

http://nofilmschool.com/2017/08/yedlin-camera-reso...

To learn more about DFS and SpeedLooks, visit looklabs.net/ to see how easily you can achieve a great color finish on your next project.



Telling A Story With Color Adds One More Dimension

Aug 10, 2017

Telling a story with moving images has been evolving so much through the years. One of the most important milestones in this journey is the progress from monochromatic to color pictures.

Telling a story with color adds one more dimension to filmmaking. Color grading is something we take for granted today, but the pioneers color filmmaking initially started by hand painting every single frame. Although it was a tedious job, it showed filmmakers the vast opportunities if they incorporated color. A step in the right direction was using filters to split the light coming from the lens into green and red hues. Combining the filtered images created an illusion of a real-world picture that was heavily lacking the blues. Technicolor expanded that idea by adding a blue channel that is the base of how our devices manage to record and project color as still or moving images. Today the pursuit is not only to perfect the process of getting an accurate color, but also to be able to capture as much extra light information as possible so it can be manipulated freely in post-production.

Film format is important, so is the digital sensor resolution, but at the end of the day all we remember is the story and the emotion evoked by the colors. Credits: Wired, Fstoppers and Tihomir Lazarov


To learn more about DFS and SpeedLooks, visit looklabs.net/ to see how easily you can achieve a great color finish on your next project.

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